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What keywords to learn more about sense pleasing?

What keywords to learn more about sense pleasing?



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The article What Makes Something Aesthetically Pleasing? | Simple Minded lists some way to pleasing your senses:

  • Vision: balance, emphasis, rhythm, proportion, pattern, unity and contrast. Along with the visual elements: color, line, shape, value, texture
  • Hearing: loudness, pitch, beat, repetition, melody, pattern, noise
  • Touch: texture, shape, weight, softness, temperature, vibration, sharpness
  • Smell: sweet, fruity, fragrant, pungent, chemical, woody, minty
  • Taste: umami, sweetness, sourness, bitterness, texture, pungency

If I want to learn more about sense pleasing, where should I start? Which subfields within psychology or neuroscience research about this? The Wikipedia page of Sensation doesn't contain the keywordpleasing. Searching on Google Scholar with the keyword sense pleasing doesn't yield anything. Two other fields relevant to this are aesthetics and design, but they are just applications of this concept.


It seems to me is that sense pleasing is better recognized by the term "rewarding stimuli":

stimuli that the brain interprets as intrinsically positive and desirable or as something to approach

Obviously rewarding stimuli isn't necessarily about sensual stimuli, but that would be a good start.


Scope

The section publishes experimental, theoretical and applied studies of psychological processes engaged in encounters between people and the built and natural environment. It covers all aspects of human behavior and mental life in relation to the sociophysical environment, whether considered as ambient environmental factors (e.g., noise, temperature, lighting), specific behavior settings (e.g., schools, offices, hospitals), the basic infrastructure of everyday life (e.g., energy and transportation systems), or in a broader sense, with regard to landscape and the relationship between built and natural aspects of human environments. Human behavior and mental life include, but are not limited to, perception and cognition, emotion, stress and mental fatigue, and social interactions, as manifest in covert and overt behavior. In brief, this Specialty Section of Frontiers in Psychology provides an outlet for researchers addressing many of the classical concerns of environmental psychology. The Specialty Section will consider thematic collections devoted to specific research topics in people-environment relations. Articles will be selected on the basis of their scientific quality and degree of theoretical and empirical significance. The Specialty Section is managed with the support of the Swedish Area Group in Environmental Psychology.


The part of the base of the brain that is connected to the spinal cord and controls messages between the brain and the rest of the body. It also controls bodily functions such as breathing and heart rate.

The ethical guidelines that cover the work of all practising and research psychologists. Produced by the British Psychological Society in its Code of Ethics and Conduct (2006) and Code of Human Research Ethics (2014). Details how participants in psychological research should be treated.


“Learn More” Links: You Can Do Better

Summary: The phrase ‘Learn More’ is increasingly used as a crutch for link labels. But the text has poor information scent and is bad for accessibility. With a little effort, transform this filler copy into descriptive labels that help users confidently predict what the next page will be.

By Katie Sherwin

on 2015-12-13 December 13, 2015

Some trends are subtler than others. Much like low-contrast text, the use of Learn More as a standalone link label has been quietly trending. The web now has an abundance of links with this generic label, largely tacked on to information of secondary or tertiary importance. (A Google search finds 1.4 billion instances of this term, though some admittedly might be from proper use of the term in general content.) Typically, these links are placed after a short paragraph that briefly introduces a topic, feature, or service, so that the Learn More points the visitor to the detail page. Usually, these links are not the main calls to action on the page, which partly explains why this copywriting detail doesn’t get as much attention or A/B testing as other calls to action.

Most of you have surely seen this pattern. Below is an example of what we’re talking about:

Smartthings.com: As a standalone label, Learn More lacks descriptive keywords to help users understand what to expect from the next page.

The proliferation of Learn More links is likely mobile driven: mobile-optimized sites are getting better at deferring secondary content. That is, instead of making all the details available by default, headings and short paragraphs provide an easy-to-scan, digestible overview of essential content. When users decide they want more information, they can tap a link or expand an accordion to get to the less important content. This design pattern is definitely beneficial on mobile, and our article is a critique of the link label only, and not of the general practice of deferring less important content.

We’ll first look at why this phrase is problematic when used by itself, and why it’s worthwhile to be more descriptive. Then we’ll explore how to figure out what to say instead, with examples of sites that have done it well. You’ll even have a chance to try rewriting labels yourself. For that final part, we recommend you have a writing utensil handy, because, yes, there will be a quiz.


Scope

The specialty of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology offers an open-access forum for theoretical perspectives that give insights into the nature of mind, brain and behavior.

The approach is highly interdisciplinary contributions at the bridge between philosophy and psychology are encouraged. The section should be both a research outlet and host debates and articles on topics and research directions that are promising and fruitful in terms of theoretical implications. We particularly encourage contributions that focus on:

epistemological issues related to the future of psychology

- e.g. future of embodied and grounded cognition

- role of enactive approaches

- implications of extended mind theories for psychology

- role of the notion of representation for psychological research

- emergence of neo-Whorfian approaches in psychology

highly debated methodological/epistemological issues

- e.g. replicability in science

- implications of dynamical systems for psychology

- role of Bayesian approaches in psychology

- role of computational models for theory building and validation in psychology

topics relevant for both philosophy and psychology

- mental imagery and simulation

- abstraction/abstractness in animal and human cognition

- effects of language on perception, categorization and thought

- sense of body, body image, body schema, bodily extensions

- interoceptive and emotional experience

- penetrability of cognition/perception

- phenomenology of perception

- stereotyping and implicit biases

- mindreading and perspective taking mindfulness

- mindreading and perspective taking mindfulness

- theories of narrative self.

These are example topics, not an exhaustive list. Contributions might be theoretical and experimental, provided that they have important theoretical implications. Experimental articles can make use of any available scientific method, including naturalistic observations, qualitative methods, laboratory experiments, clinical interviews, case studies, computer simulations and modeling, brain imaging and electrophysiological methods. Experiments can involve humans (children and adults) and other animals. Theoretical articles should rely on strong empirical evidence. The focus in on cognitive, developmental and social psychology, not on psychoanalysis. Articles will be selected on the basis of their scientific quality and of the richness of their theoretical implications.


7 Signs You’re Too Much of a Perfectionist

We hear it as praise all the time. Perfect! Flawless! Impeccable! But can anything truly be perfect? Is perfection even an ideal we should be reaching for?

While it&rsquos up to philosophers to hash out the nature of perfection, psychologists can tell us this: Too much perfectionism is not good for us. Sure, a drive to better ourselves can help us stay committed to challenging tasks and overcome serious obstacles, but psychologists have linked excessive perfectionism with mental health problems such as depression, eating disorders, anxiety and more. * Perfectionism can even increase your risk of death. &dagger

So how do you know if your perfectionism is hurting you more than helping? Well, mental health professionals have identified a number of signs we can use to measure whether our need to be perfect is causing more problems than it&rsquos solving. The most common signs include:

You&rsquore a Perfectionist in All Things

It&rsquos one thing to want to be perfect in your profession. It&rsquos a whole other thing to want to be perfect in every single task you face. For instance, unless you&rsquore a chef, you shouldn&rsquot be too upset when you overcook a steak or your pasta dish doesn&rsquot come out as beautifully as the pictures in the cookbook. If you find yourself getting terribly frustrated every time you fall short of perfection, no matter the task, your perfectionism is likely harming your quality of life.

You&rsquore an All or Nothing Person

If you believe that second place is really just the first loser, your perfectionism may be warping your ability to strive for realistic success. True success is not either/or and it&rsquos not a finite resource. You can be successful&mdashand take pride in your success&mdashwithout being the absolute best or the only one at the top.

You Crave Approval

Who judges perfection? In the minds of many perfectionists, it&rsquos other people. This tends to make perfectionists desire approval above all else. If you find yourself focusing more on what people say about your efforts than on the efforts themselves, your perfectionism is negatively affecting your priorities.

Feedback Makes You Defensive

We all tend to get upset if someone says something unkind to us. But there&rsquos a difference between a cruel comment and one intended to help you improve. Perfectionists have a hard time distinguishing between the two and will often lash out at constructive feedback. Your perfectionism is not helping you if you have a hard time sitting through a performance review without getting into an argument.

You&rsquore Highly Critical of Others

If you feel as if you have to be the best all the time, you may resort to tearing other people down to make yourself feel elevated. While we&rsquore all critical of others from time to time, a level of perfectionism that leads you to be constantly critical can hurt your professional standing and cause you to lose friends.

You&rsquore a Big Procrastinator

One of the core aspects of harmful perfectionism is a fear of failure. In many people, this fear manifests in avoidance behavior like procrastination. If you don&rsquot do the task, you can&rsquot fail, right? But that kind of thinking can put you endlessly behind on deadlines and add a lot of stress to your life.

You&rsquore Full of Guilt

If you feel as if you have to be your best no matter what, any mistake, however small, can feel like a significant failure. This can make you feel as if you&rsquore constantly failing, which can, in turn, lead to a persistent sense of guilt. If you often feel as if you&rsquore always letting others and yourself down, your perfectionism is getting in your way of enjoying life.

How Can You Learn More About Perfectionism?

Perfectionism is one of the most fascinating issues in psychology, as it can both benefit and harm us. If you&rsquore interested in learning about perfectionism and other issues of psychology, you should consider earning an MS in Psychology. This advanced degree in psychology can prepare you to work in academia or in a variety of other fields. In fact, there are careers in psychology in every type of industry.

Best of all, to earn your master&rsquos in psychology, you don&rsquot have to attend a campus-based school of psychology. Instead you can enroll in an online university and complete the majority of your master&rsquos program in psychology from home and on a schedule that can allow you to continue working full time. Plus, the convenience and flexibility of an online master&rsquos in psychology program can allow you to complete your psychology degree faster and for less cost than you might expect.

Perfectionism is one of the many ways our minds can help or harm us. You can learn a lot more when you earn a master&rsquos degree in psychology online.

Walden University is an accredited institution offering an online MS in Psychology degree program. Expand your career options and earn your degree in a convenient, flexible format that fits your busy life.

*E. Benson, The Many Faces of Perfectionism, Monitor on Psychology, on the internet at www.apa.org/monitor/nov03/manyfaces.aspx.
&daggerR. Rettner, The Dark Side of Perfectionism Revealed, LiveScience, on the internet at www.livescience.com/6724-dark-side-perfectionism-revealed.html.

Walden University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission, www.hlcommission.org.

Whether looking for information on programs, admissions, or financial aid, we're here to help.

Fill out the form and we will contact you to provide information about furthering your education.


B

Black Lives Matter

A political movement to address systemic and state violence against African Americans. Per the Black Lives Matter organizers: “In 2013, three radical Black organizers—Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi—created a Black-centered political will and movement building project called #BlackLivesMatter. It was in response to the acquittal of Trayvon Martin’s murderer, George Zimmerman. The project is now a member-led global network of more than 40 chapters. [Black Lives Matter] members organize and build local power to intervene in violence inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes. Black Lives Matter is an ideological and political intervention in a world where Black lives are systematically and intentionally targeted for demise. It is an affirmation of Black folks’ humanity, our contributions to this society, and our resilience in the face of deadly oppression.”


Career Paths

With their strong dislike for routine, ESFPs do best in careers that involve a lot of variety. Jobs that involve a great deal of socializing are also a great fit, allowing individuals with this personality type to put their considerable people skills to good use. Careers that involve a great deal of structure and solitary work can be difficult for ESFPs, and they often become bored in such situations.

Popular ESFP Careers

  • Artist
  • Actor
  • Athletic coach
  • Child care provider
  • Musician
  • Human resources specialist
  • Fashion designer

Advertisers’ changing relationship with the keyword for targeting

Circa 2015 PPC: In the old days, we would build lists (I’m talking, LISTS) of detailed long-term keywords (exact match, of course!) based especially on modifiers (where we really could flesh out intent).

This might look like thousands of ad groups according to the following:
[best flat screen tv under 1000]
[65inch plasma tv above fireplace]
[samsung large lcd tv]
[samsung tv vs sony tv]

While we could use broader keywords for upper-funnel targeting, the truly savvy advertisers got focused and ultra-specific with what terms they would target. Long live the long-tail, purchase-intent revealing keyword!

PPC in 2021 and beyond:
Privacy regulations and changes are beginning to wreak havoc on the specificity of tracking. In addition, user behavior has been trained by Google personalized results to never spend more time than they have to typing (or speaking) into a phone (more on this to come below).

A few years ago, Rand Fishkin gathered data and presented some remarkable findings on search behavior trending towards shorter queries. He discovered that 46% of searches are one- or two-word search queries. Nearly one out of every two searches doesn’t even get to three words! Imagine what that is in 2021 (no, really, I’d love some data on this… I looked and asked, and I couldn’t find any).

Tim Soulo of AHREFs reminds us that long-tail keywords are not the same as multiple-word keywords (a good reminder) in his helpful and accessible article on the long-tail keyword. It is helpful to note his keyword length vs. monthly search volume chart within the article, which also demonstrates the significant number of fewer-word keywords in the head terms (high search volume) camp.

While users still search for a significant amount of new, long-tail keywords (regardless of word length within the term), my hypothesis is that user behavior has changed, along with platform changes, to result in a different PPC keyword landscape than has ever been seen before.

The wise PPCer will identify the ways in which adaptation is important, even while frustrated about losing search term data. We are stuck now, because the best-converting keywords to bid on in our accounts have likely shifted (in many, but certainly not every, instance) to look like this:

[best tv 2021]
[led tv]
[samsung]

If we had bid on those three terms in 2015, our budgets would have resembled waste flushed down a toilet, and disappearing quickly. Now, those terms may be the core of our accounts.

Here is my assertion: We are seeing a shift in user behavior to intent-obfuscating search terms, which then impacts purchase behavior and our keyword targeting and bidding capabilities. This shift (along with Google Ads changes that may or may not be in reaction to this shift) is going to continue to force us to rethink our keyword targeting strategies.


Spending time in nature makes people feel more alive, study shows

Feeling sluggish? The solution may require getting outside the box -- that big brick-and-mortar box called a building.

Being outside in nature makes people feel more alive, finds a series of studies published in the June 2010 issue of the Journal of Environmental Psychology. And that sense of increased vitality exists above and beyond the energizing effects of physical activity and social interaction that are often associated with our forays into the natural world, the studies show.

"Nature is fuel for the soul, " says Richard Ryan, lead author and a professor of psychology at the University of Rochester. "Often when we feel depleted we reach for a cup of coffee, but research suggests a better way to get energized is to connect with nature," he says.

The findings, adds Ryan, are important for both mental and physical health. "Research has shown that people with a greater sense of vitality don't just have more energy for things they want to do, they are also more resilient to physical illnesses. One of the pathways to health may be to spend more time in natural settings," says Ryan.

In recent years, numerous experimental psychology studies have linked exposure to nature with increased energy and heightened sense of well-being. For example, research has shown that people on wilderness excursions report feeling more alive and that just recalling outdoor experiences increases feelings of happiness and health. Other studies suggest that the very presence of nature helps to ward off feelings of exhaustion and that 90 percent of people report increased energy when placed in outdoor activities.

What is novel about this research, write the authors, is that it carefully tests whether this increased vitality associated with the outdoors is simply the feel-good spillover from physical activity and people-mixing often present in these situations. To tease out the effects of nature alone, the authors conducted five separate experiments, involving 537 college students in actual and imagined contexts. In one experiment, participants were led on a 15-minute walk through indoor hallways or along a tree-lined river path. In another, the undergraduates viewed photographic scenes of buildings or landscapes. A third experiment required students to imagine themselves in a variety of situations both active and sedentary, inside and out, and with and without others.

Two final experiments tracked participants' moods and energy levels throughout the day using diary entries. Over either four days or two weeks, students recorded their exercise, social interactions, time spent outside, and exposure to natural environments, including plants and windows.

Across all methodologies, individuals consistently felt more energetic when they spent time in natural settings or imagined themselves in such situations. The findings were particularly robust, notes Ryan being outside in nature for just 20 minutes in a day was enough to significantly boost vitality levels. Interestingly, in the last study, the presence of nature had an independent energizing effect above that of being outdoors. In other words, conclude the authors, being outdoors was vitalizing in large part because of the presence of nature.

The paper builds on earlier research by Ryan, Netta Weinstein, a psychologist at the University of Hamburg, Germany, and others showing that people are more caring and generous when exposed to nature. "We have a natural connection with living things," says Ryan. "Nature is something within which we flourish, so having it be more a part of our lives is critical, especially when we live and work in built environments." These studies, concludes Ryan, underscore the importance of having access to parks and natural surroundings and of incorporating natural elements into our buildings through windows and indoor plants.

The paper was coauthored by Weinstein Jessey Bernstein, McGill University Kirk Warren Brown, Virginia Commonwealth University Louis Mastella, University of Rochester and Marylène Gagné, Concordia University.

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Rochester. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


The part of the base of the brain that is connected to the spinal cord and controls messages between the brain and the rest of the body. It also controls bodily functions such as breathing and heart rate.

The ethical guidelines that cover the work of all practising and research psychologists. Produced by the British Psychological Society in its Code of Ethics and Conduct (2006) and Code of Human Research Ethics (2014). Details how participants in psychological research should be treated.


7 Signs You’re Too Much of a Perfectionist

We hear it as praise all the time. Perfect! Flawless! Impeccable! But can anything truly be perfect? Is perfection even an ideal we should be reaching for?

While it&rsquos up to philosophers to hash out the nature of perfection, psychologists can tell us this: Too much perfectionism is not good for us. Sure, a drive to better ourselves can help us stay committed to challenging tasks and overcome serious obstacles, but psychologists have linked excessive perfectionism with mental health problems such as depression, eating disorders, anxiety and more. * Perfectionism can even increase your risk of death. &dagger

So how do you know if your perfectionism is hurting you more than helping? Well, mental health professionals have identified a number of signs we can use to measure whether our need to be perfect is causing more problems than it&rsquos solving. The most common signs include:

You&rsquore a Perfectionist in All Things

It&rsquos one thing to want to be perfect in your profession. It&rsquos a whole other thing to want to be perfect in every single task you face. For instance, unless you&rsquore a chef, you shouldn&rsquot be too upset when you overcook a steak or your pasta dish doesn&rsquot come out as beautifully as the pictures in the cookbook. If you find yourself getting terribly frustrated every time you fall short of perfection, no matter the task, your perfectionism is likely harming your quality of life.

You&rsquore an All or Nothing Person

If you believe that second place is really just the first loser, your perfectionism may be warping your ability to strive for realistic success. True success is not either/or and it&rsquos not a finite resource. You can be successful&mdashand take pride in your success&mdashwithout being the absolute best or the only one at the top.

You Crave Approval

Who judges perfection? In the minds of many perfectionists, it&rsquos other people. This tends to make perfectionists desire approval above all else. If you find yourself focusing more on what people say about your efforts than on the efforts themselves, your perfectionism is negatively affecting your priorities.

Feedback Makes You Defensive

We all tend to get upset if someone says something unkind to us. But there&rsquos a difference between a cruel comment and one intended to help you improve. Perfectionists have a hard time distinguishing between the two and will often lash out at constructive feedback. Your perfectionism is not helping you if you have a hard time sitting through a performance review without getting into an argument.

You&rsquore Highly Critical of Others

If you feel as if you have to be the best all the time, you may resort to tearing other people down to make yourself feel elevated. While we&rsquore all critical of others from time to time, a level of perfectionism that leads you to be constantly critical can hurt your professional standing and cause you to lose friends.

You&rsquore a Big Procrastinator

One of the core aspects of harmful perfectionism is a fear of failure. In many people, this fear manifests in avoidance behavior like procrastination. If you don&rsquot do the task, you can&rsquot fail, right? But that kind of thinking can put you endlessly behind on deadlines and add a lot of stress to your life.

You&rsquore Full of Guilt

If you feel as if you have to be your best no matter what, any mistake, however small, can feel like a significant failure. This can make you feel as if you&rsquore constantly failing, which can, in turn, lead to a persistent sense of guilt. If you often feel as if you&rsquore always letting others and yourself down, your perfectionism is getting in your way of enjoying life.

How Can You Learn More About Perfectionism?

Perfectionism is one of the most fascinating issues in psychology, as it can both benefit and harm us. If you&rsquore interested in learning about perfectionism and other issues of psychology, you should consider earning an MS in Psychology. This advanced degree in psychology can prepare you to work in academia or in a variety of other fields. In fact, there are careers in psychology in every type of industry.

Best of all, to earn your master&rsquos in psychology, you don&rsquot have to attend a campus-based school of psychology. Instead you can enroll in an online university and complete the majority of your master&rsquos program in psychology from home and on a schedule that can allow you to continue working full time. Plus, the convenience and flexibility of an online master&rsquos in psychology program can allow you to complete your psychology degree faster and for less cost than you might expect.

Perfectionism is one of the many ways our minds can help or harm us. You can learn a lot more when you earn a master&rsquos degree in psychology online.

Walden University is an accredited institution offering an online MS in Psychology degree program. Expand your career options and earn your degree in a convenient, flexible format that fits your busy life.

*E. Benson, The Many Faces of Perfectionism, Monitor on Psychology, on the internet at www.apa.org/monitor/nov03/manyfaces.aspx.
&daggerR. Rettner, The Dark Side of Perfectionism Revealed, LiveScience, on the internet at www.livescience.com/6724-dark-side-perfectionism-revealed.html.

Walden University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission, www.hlcommission.org.

Whether looking for information on programs, admissions, or financial aid, we're here to help.

Fill out the form and we will contact you to provide information about furthering your education.


“Learn More” Links: You Can Do Better

Summary: The phrase ‘Learn More’ is increasingly used as a crutch for link labels. But the text has poor information scent and is bad for accessibility. With a little effort, transform this filler copy into descriptive labels that help users confidently predict what the next page will be.

By Katie Sherwin

on 2015-12-13 December 13, 2015

Some trends are subtler than others. Much like low-contrast text, the use of Learn More as a standalone link label has been quietly trending. The web now has an abundance of links with this generic label, largely tacked on to information of secondary or tertiary importance. (A Google search finds 1.4 billion instances of this term, though some admittedly might be from proper use of the term in general content.) Typically, these links are placed after a short paragraph that briefly introduces a topic, feature, or service, so that the Learn More points the visitor to the detail page. Usually, these links are not the main calls to action on the page, which partly explains why this copywriting detail doesn’t get as much attention or A/B testing as other calls to action.

Most of you have surely seen this pattern. Below is an example of what we’re talking about:

Smartthings.com: As a standalone label, Learn More lacks descriptive keywords to help users understand what to expect from the next page.

The proliferation of Learn More links is likely mobile driven: mobile-optimized sites are getting better at deferring secondary content. That is, instead of making all the details available by default, headings and short paragraphs provide an easy-to-scan, digestible overview of essential content. When users decide they want more information, they can tap a link or expand an accordion to get to the less important content. This design pattern is definitely beneficial on mobile, and our article is a critique of the link label only, and not of the general practice of deferring less important content.

We’ll first look at why this phrase is problematic when used by itself, and why it’s worthwhile to be more descriptive. Then we’ll explore how to figure out what to say instead, with examples of sites that have done it well. You’ll even have a chance to try rewriting labels yourself. For that final part, we recommend you have a writing utensil handy, because, yes, there will be a quiz.


B

Black Lives Matter

A political movement to address systemic and state violence against African Americans. Per the Black Lives Matter organizers: “In 2013, three radical Black organizers—Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi—created a Black-centered political will and movement building project called #BlackLivesMatter. It was in response to the acquittal of Trayvon Martin’s murderer, George Zimmerman. The project is now a member-led global network of more than 40 chapters. [Black Lives Matter] members organize and build local power to intervene in violence inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes. Black Lives Matter is an ideological and political intervention in a world where Black lives are systematically and intentionally targeted for demise. It is an affirmation of Black folks’ humanity, our contributions to this society, and our resilience in the face of deadly oppression.”


Spending time in nature makes people feel more alive, study shows

Feeling sluggish? The solution may require getting outside the box -- that big brick-and-mortar box called a building.

Being outside in nature makes people feel more alive, finds a series of studies published in the June 2010 issue of the Journal of Environmental Psychology. And that sense of increased vitality exists above and beyond the energizing effects of physical activity and social interaction that are often associated with our forays into the natural world, the studies show.

"Nature is fuel for the soul, " says Richard Ryan, lead author and a professor of psychology at the University of Rochester. "Often when we feel depleted we reach for a cup of coffee, but research suggests a better way to get energized is to connect with nature," he says.

The findings, adds Ryan, are important for both mental and physical health. "Research has shown that people with a greater sense of vitality don't just have more energy for things they want to do, they are also more resilient to physical illnesses. One of the pathways to health may be to spend more time in natural settings," says Ryan.

In recent years, numerous experimental psychology studies have linked exposure to nature with increased energy and heightened sense of well-being. For example, research has shown that people on wilderness excursions report feeling more alive and that just recalling outdoor experiences increases feelings of happiness and health. Other studies suggest that the very presence of nature helps to ward off feelings of exhaustion and that 90 percent of people report increased energy when placed in outdoor activities.

What is novel about this research, write the authors, is that it carefully tests whether this increased vitality associated with the outdoors is simply the feel-good spillover from physical activity and people-mixing often present in these situations. To tease out the effects of nature alone, the authors conducted five separate experiments, involving 537 college students in actual and imagined contexts. In one experiment, participants were led on a 15-minute walk through indoor hallways or along a tree-lined river path. In another, the undergraduates viewed photographic scenes of buildings or landscapes. A third experiment required students to imagine themselves in a variety of situations both active and sedentary, inside and out, and with and without others.

Two final experiments tracked participants' moods and energy levels throughout the day using diary entries. Over either four days or two weeks, students recorded their exercise, social interactions, time spent outside, and exposure to natural environments, including plants and windows.

Across all methodologies, individuals consistently felt more energetic when they spent time in natural settings or imagined themselves in such situations. The findings were particularly robust, notes Ryan being outside in nature for just 20 minutes in a day was enough to significantly boost vitality levels. Interestingly, in the last study, the presence of nature had an independent energizing effect above that of being outdoors. In other words, conclude the authors, being outdoors was vitalizing in large part because of the presence of nature.

The paper builds on earlier research by Ryan, Netta Weinstein, a psychologist at the University of Hamburg, Germany, and others showing that people are more caring and generous when exposed to nature. "We have a natural connection with living things," says Ryan. "Nature is something within which we flourish, so having it be more a part of our lives is critical, especially when we live and work in built environments." These studies, concludes Ryan, underscore the importance of having access to parks and natural surroundings and of incorporating natural elements into our buildings through windows and indoor plants.

The paper was coauthored by Weinstein Jessey Bernstein, McGill University Kirk Warren Brown, Virginia Commonwealth University Louis Mastella, University of Rochester and Marylène Gagné, Concordia University.

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Rochester. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Scope

The section publishes experimental, theoretical and applied studies of psychological processes engaged in encounters between people and the built and natural environment. It covers all aspects of human behavior and mental life in relation to the sociophysical environment, whether considered as ambient environmental factors (e.g., noise, temperature, lighting), specific behavior settings (e.g., schools, offices, hospitals), the basic infrastructure of everyday life (e.g., energy and transportation systems), or in a broader sense, with regard to landscape and the relationship between built and natural aspects of human environments. Human behavior and mental life include, but are not limited to, perception and cognition, emotion, stress and mental fatigue, and social interactions, as manifest in covert and overt behavior. In brief, this Specialty Section of Frontiers in Psychology provides an outlet for researchers addressing many of the classical concerns of environmental psychology. The Specialty Section will consider thematic collections devoted to specific research topics in people-environment relations. Articles will be selected on the basis of their scientific quality and degree of theoretical and empirical significance. The Specialty Section is managed with the support of the Swedish Area Group in Environmental Psychology.


Scope

The specialty of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology offers an open-access forum for theoretical perspectives that give insights into the nature of mind, brain and behavior.

The approach is highly interdisciplinary contributions at the bridge between philosophy and psychology are encouraged. The section should be both a research outlet and host debates and articles on topics and research directions that are promising and fruitful in terms of theoretical implications. We particularly encourage contributions that focus on:

epistemological issues related to the future of psychology

- e.g. future of embodied and grounded cognition

- role of enactive approaches

- implications of extended mind theories for psychology

- role of the notion of representation for psychological research

- emergence of neo-Whorfian approaches in psychology

highly debated methodological/epistemological issues

- e.g. replicability in science

- implications of dynamical systems for psychology

- role of Bayesian approaches in psychology

- role of computational models for theory building and validation in psychology

topics relevant for both philosophy and psychology

- mental imagery and simulation

- abstraction/abstractness in animal and human cognition

- effects of language on perception, categorization and thought

- sense of body, body image, body schema, bodily extensions

- interoceptive and emotional experience

- penetrability of cognition/perception

- phenomenology of perception

- stereotyping and implicit biases

- mindreading and perspective taking mindfulness

- mindreading and perspective taking mindfulness

- theories of narrative self.

These are example topics, not an exhaustive list. Contributions might be theoretical and experimental, provided that they have important theoretical implications. Experimental articles can make use of any available scientific method, including naturalistic observations, qualitative methods, laboratory experiments, clinical interviews, case studies, computer simulations and modeling, brain imaging and electrophysiological methods. Experiments can involve humans (children and adults) and other animals. Theoretical articles should rely on strong empirical evidence. The focus in on cognitive, developmental and social psychology, not on psychoanalysis. Articles will be selected on the basis of their scientific quality and of the richness of their theoretical implications.


Career Paths

With their strong dislike for routine, ESFPs do best in careers that involve a lot of variety. Jobs that involve a great deal of socializing are also a great fit, allowing individuals with this personality type to put their considerable people skills to good use. Careers that involve a great deal of structure and solitary work can be difficult for ESFPs, and they often become bored in such situations.

Popular ESFP Careers

  • Artist
  • Actor
  • Athletic coach
  • Child care provider
  • Musician
  • Human resources specialist
  • Fashion designer

Advertisers’ changing relationship with the keyword for targeting

Circa 2015 PPC: In the old days, we would build lists (I’m talking, LISTS) of detailed long-term keywords (exact match, of course!) based especially on modifiers (where we really could flesh out intent).

This might look like thousands of ad groups according to the following:
[best flat screen tv under 1000]
[65inch plasma tv above fireplace]
[samsung large lcd tv]
[samsung tv vs sony tv]

While we could use broader keywords for upper-funnel targeting, the truly savvy advertisers got focused and ultra-specific with what terms they would target. Long live the long-tail, purchase-intent revealing keyword!

PPC in 2021 and beyond:
Privacy regulations and changes are beginning to wreak havoc on the specificity of tracking. In addition, user behavior has been trained by Google personalized results to never spend more time than they have to typing (or speaking) into a phone (more on this to come below).

A few years ago, Rand Fishkin gathered data and presented some remarkable findings on search behavior trending towards shorter queries. He discovered that 46% of searches are one- or two-word search queries. Nearly one out of every two searches doesn’t even get to three words! Imagine what that is in 2021 (no, really, I’d love some data on this… I looked and asked, and I couldn’t find any).

Tim Soulo of AHREFs reminds us that long-tail keywords are not the same as multiple-word keywords (a good reminder) in his helpful and accessible article on the long-tail keyword. It is helpful to note his keyword length vs. monthly search volume chart within the article, which also demonstrates the significant number of fewer-word keywords in the head terms (high search volume) camp.

While users still search for a significant amount of new, long-tail keywords (regardless of word length within the term), my hypothesis is that user behavior has changed, along with platform changes, to result in a different PPC keyword landscape than has ever been seen before.

The wise PPCer will identify the ways in which adaptation is important, even while frustrated about losing search term data. We are stuck now, because the best-converting keywords to bid on in our accounts have likely shifted (in many, but certainly not every, instance) to look like this:

[best tv 2021]
[led tv]
[samsung]

If we had bid on those three terms in 2015, our budgets would have resembled waste flushed down a toilet, and disappearing quickly. Now, those terms may be the core of our accounts.

Here is my assertion: We are seeing a shift in user behavior to intent-obfuscating search terms, which then impacts purchase behavior and our keyword targeting and bidding capabilities. This shift (along with Google Ads changes that may or may not be in reaction to this shift) is going to continue to force us to rethink our keyword targeting strategies.